The five stages of grief

Victoria Siemer - The Five stages of grief - Because Art Is - becauseartis.com

Victoria Siemer
The five stages of grief. ( Les cinq étapes du deuil ).
Photography, 2014.

« Victoria is a graphic designer living in Brooklyn NY. Obsessed with the idea of the fragmented self, she recreates and develops this theme in her visual work. It’s as if the art itself is an act of repetition compulsion for her. »

Victoria est designer graphique, vivant à Brooklyn, New York. Obsédée par l’idée de l’être fragmenté, elle crée et développe ce thème dans son travail artistique. C’est comme si, l’art lui-même, était une compulsion répétitive selon l’artiste.

Quote from WorldPhoto.org – Trad. by Because Art Is.

The artist website (here) – Le site internet de l’artiste (ici).

Article about her on a very interesting website : Artists inspire Artists (here) – Article sur elle sur un site internet très intéressant : Artists Inspire Artists (ici).

The title of the artwork seems to be a reference to Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s book “On Death and Dying”, written in 1969.  She was the first to develope the idea of five stages in normal grief.

Le titre de l’oeuvre semble être une référence au livre de Elisabeth Kübler-Ross “On Death and Dying », écrit en 1969. L’écrivaine fut la première à développer l’idée des cinq étapes d’un deuil classique.

More details on psychcentral (here).

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BECAUSEARTIS Evelyn Bencicova

Icon, by Evelyn Bencicova, Photography, February 2015

Evelyn Bencicova is a photographer and artistic director from Bratislava, working in Berlin. Only a few informations are available online about her work. So, we decided to share a part of an interview that you can read on  » the culture trip  » website. (see bellow)

Evelyn Bencicova est photographe et directrice artistique née à Bratislava et travaillant à Berlin. Peu d’informations décrivent son oeuvre en ligne. Vous trouverez donc ci-dessous le lien vers une interviews complète paru dans  » the culture trip « . (Ci-dessous un extrait)

Pour voir les photos, to see the pictures : Evelyn Bencicova website

 

« Geometries of Nudity: Evelyn Bencicova’s Raw Photography

An emerging young talent from Bratislava, Natalia Evelyn Bencicova (b. 1992) is a promising visual creative whose work explores mixed media with photography. Currently studying in Vienna, she works mostly with digital photography, actively pursuing a point where the commercial and the artistic meet. We talk to Evelyn about her life, art and philosophy.

TCT: Thanks for joining us here, Evelyn. Tell us – what’s your story?

E: In very few words: I want to communicate the things that I see through the medium of photography. With each project I’m trying to bring something new and innovative at least for me, to educate myself and go deeper into the topics which I consider interesting. My life is about getting inspired and my work about delivering this inspiration further.

What do you care about the most when taking photographs?

Most of my work happens before the photoshoot. A journey from the original idea to the final picture is usually very long and complicated in staged photography, which is what I do. It includes concept development, research, production, creative direction, the scouting of faces and locations, styling, hair and make-up plus whole process of organization and communication. Everything is important. Even if I try to cover a large part of this myself, there are a lot of amazing people who always help and support me, first and foremost my close friend Adam Csoka Keller, as well as many others, without whom most of my projects would not have been possible. Normally we work without any budget in very improvised conditions. I believe that most of creativity is born out of discomfort and lack of resources, when you are forced to invent new solutions. Anyway, I would never exchange the exciting and free atmosphere of our shoots for anything else! »

(entire article here / La suite ici )

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Harmonie

Harmonie, Laurent Chehere Flying Houses

Laurent Chéhère

Site internet de l’artiste Laurent Chéhère

« En mixant photographie traditionnelle et manipulation numérique, sa série surréaliste Flying Houses élève l’architecture à un niveau jamais vu. L’artiste isole des bâtiments de leur contexte urbain et les libère de leur environnement étouffant. Les maisons volent ainsi dans les nuages, tels des cerfs-volants.

Inspiré par une vision poétique du vieux Paris et par le célèbre court-métrage Le Ballon rouge d’Albert Lamorisse, Laurent Chéhère a parcouru les quartiers de Belleville et de Ménilmontant en posant son regard sur leurs maisons typiques et « fatiguées ». Les images de l’artiste saisissent une lévitation inattendue : maintenues au sol par des mains invisibles, comme autant de ballons retenus par des fils, ces anciennes bâtisses flottent dans le ciel, glissant sur la surface, elles nous dévoilent leur beauté cachée. » (suite de l’article sur le site ArtActuel)

« Laurent Chéhère is an award-winning French photographer known for his commercial work for clients such as Audi and Nike. He left the advertising industry to travel the world and along the way was born his flying houses series, a collection of fantastical buildings, homes, tents and trailers removed from their backgrounds and suspended in the sky as if permanently airborne. » (read the entire article on Muriel Guepin Gallery’s website)

 
« Laurent Chéhère only began exhibiting his photography in 2012—before then, he was solely known as an award-winning editorial and commercial photographer. A shift in interest led Chéhère to leave advertising behind to travel around the world. It was during this that he began to kindle his love for architecture and its narrative possibilities. Chéhère’s most famous series, titled “Flying Houses” (2012–), is comprised of fictional buildings suspended above backdrops of clouded skies. Each image is a composite of up to a dozen real buildings, homes, tents, and trailers that Chéhère has photographed in similar lighting conditions, and composited using Photoshop. Chéhère describes the series as a means to help buildings tell their stories, whether “real or not, funny or sad.” (from Artsy)

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